heyfunniest:

jingledink:

found two kitties cuddling by the sea

relationship goals

(via eruditionanimaladoration)

photocait:

Just lines - can’t wait to finish it!
Myles Kimball at Grim North Tattoo & One King Tattoo.

photocait:

Just lines - can’t wait to finish it!

Myles Kimball at Grim North Tattoo & One King Tattoo.

(via beautifuld-is-as-ter)

tillatheseasgangdry:

valiantparadox:

moniquill:

naamahdarling:

wrath-fire-ice:

Bury me in this.

*SCREAMS*

Get buried in this, get found by archeologists ten thousand years later, get presumed some kind of monarch or holy figure.

what do you mean presumed

slapmytittiez

tillatheseasgangdry:

valiantparadox:

moniquill:

naamahdarling:

wrath-fire-ice:

Bury me in this.

*SCREAMS*

Get buried in this, get found by archeologists ten thousand years later, get presumed some kind of monarch or holy figure.

what do you mean presumed

slapmytittiez

(via goblinfae)

so the director of the environmental science department is paying us a visit today. He just went through all the fridges to check for alcohol. He found a bottle of Bacardi too, owned by one of the older gentlemen here.

I’m just upset cause there’s no running water. We can’t shower, cook, wash dishes…etc and this man is on the hunt for the owner of this barcardi (when no one at the station is under age). 

Like Sir…. where the hell are your priorities right now

dynastylnoire:

youngnaturalfree:

*Sigh*

……missing the point and proving the point as to why natural hair pride is necessary

dynastylnoire:

youngnaturalfree:

*Sigh*

……missing the point and proving the point as to why natural hair pride is necessary

(via wretchedoftheearth)

american-horror-story-official:

October 15. My body is ready.

american-horror-story-official:

October 15. My body is ready.

(via lifegoesonivonne)

neuromorphogenesis:

Nanoparticles may harm the brain
A simple change in electric charge may make the difference between someone getting the medicine they need and a trip to the emergency room—at least if a new study bears out. Researchers investigating the toxicity of particles designed to ferry drugs inside the body have found that carriers with a positive charge on their surface appear to cause damage if they reach the brain.
These particles, called micelles, are one type of a class of materials known as nanoparticles. By varying properties such as charge, composition, and attached surface molecules, researchers can design nanoparticles to deliver medicine to specific body regions and cell types—and even to carry medicine into cells. This ability allows drugs to directly target locations they would otherwise be unable to, such as the heart of tumors. Researchers are also looking at nanoparticles as a way to transport drugs across the blood-brain barrier, a wall of tightly connected cells that keeps most medication out of the brain. Just how safe nanoparticles in the brain are, however, remains unclear.
So Kristina Bram Knudsen, a toxicologist at the National Research Centre for the Working Environment in Copenhagen, and colleagues tested two types of micelles, which were made from different polymers that gave the micelles either a positive or negative surface charge. They injected both versions, empty of drugs, into the brains of rats, and 1 week later they checked for damage. Three out of the five rats injected with the positively charged micelles developed brain lesions. The rats injected with the negatively charged micelles or a saline control solution did not suffer any observable harm from the injections, the team will report in an upcoming issue of Nanotoxicology.
Knudsen speculates that one of the attributes that makes positive micelles and similar nanoparticles such powerful drug delivery systems may also be what is causing the brain damage. Because cells have a negative charge on their outside, they attract positively charged micelles and bring them into the cell. The micelles’ presence in the cell or alteration of the cell’s surface charge, she says, may disrupt the cell’s normal functioning.
Negatively charged nanoparticles can also enter cells, according to other research. However, they do so less readily and must be able to overcome the repulsion between themselves and the cell surface. It is possible that the reason the negatively charged micelles were not found to be toxic was that they did not invade cells to the same extent as the positively charged micelles. 
The findings are intriguing, says biomedical engineer Jordan Green of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. But he cautions that there is no evidence that all positively charged nanoparticles behave this way. Other factors can also play a role in the toxicity of nanoparticles, adds pharmaceutical expert Jian-Qing Gao of Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China. The size and concentration of the particles, as well as the strain of rat used, could all have influenced the results, he says.

neuromorphogenesis:

Nanoparticles may harm the brain

A simple change in electric charge may make the difference between someone getting the medicine they need and a trip to the emergency room—at least if a new study bears out. Researchers investigating the toxicity of particles designed to ferry drugs inside the body have found that carriers with a positive charge on their surface appear to cause damage if they reach the brain.

These particles, called micelles, are one type of a class of materials known as nanoparticles. By varying properties such as charge, composition, and attached surface molecules, researchers can design nanoparticles to deliver medicine to specific body regions and cell types—and even to carry medicine into cells. This ability allows drugs to directly target locations they would otherwise be unable to, such as the heart of tumors. Researchers are also looking at nanoparticles as a way to transport drugs across the blood-brain barrier, a wall of tightly connected cells that keeps most medication out of the brain. Just how safe nanoparticles in the brain are, however, remains unclear.

So Kristina Bram Knudsen, a toxicologist at the National Research Centre for the Working Environment in Copenhagen, and colleagues tested two types of micelles, which were made from different polymers that gave the micelles either a positive or negative surface charge. They injected both versions, empty of drugs, into the brains of rats, and 1 week later they checked for damage. Three out of the five rats injected with the positively charged micelles developed brain lesions. The rats injected with the negatively charged micelles or a saline control solution did not suffer any observable harm from the injections, the team will report in an upcoming issue of Nanotoxicology.

Knudsen speculates that one of the attributes that makes positive micelles and similar nanoparticles such powerful drug delivery systems may also be what is causing the brain damage. Because cells have a negative charge on their outside, they attract positively charged micelles and bring them into the cell. The micelles’ presence in the cell or alteration of the cell’s surface charge, she says, may disrupt the cell’s normal functioning.

Negatively charged nanoparticles can also enter cells, according to other research. However, they do so less readily and must be able to overcome the repulsion between themselves and the cell surface. It is possible that the reason the negatively charged micelles were not found to be toxic was that they did not invade cells to the same extent as the positively charged micelles. 

The findings are intriguing, says biomedical engineer Jordan Green of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. But he cautions that there is no evidence that all positively charged nanoparticles behave this way. Other factors can also play a role in the toxicity of nanoparticles, adds pharmaceutical expert Jian-Qing Gao of Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China. The size and concentration of the particles, as well as the strain of rat used, could all have influenced the results, he says.

(via sciencetoastudent)

bukiberrywaffles:

earthnation:

DONT GO THRU OLD CONVERSATIONS WITH SOMEONE WHO U USED TO BE CLOSE WITH

I love American, Canadian, and British soldiers.    Being a Canadian Soldier myself and serving three tours in    Afghanistan so far, Soldiers are the best bros you will ever meet.        I Just had a feel because I'm thinking about some of the boys    I knew who gave their lives to protect the citizens of these    faraway lands, and for those back home.        R.I.P.    Sgt James Knoxx    MCpl Bryon Greff    Cpl Steve Martin    Sgt James Macneil        Cede Nullis boys    (Yield for no one)        I thank OP for reminding some people on FunnyJunk that we have Soldiers dying    to keep others out of harms way, even if the intention of the political    leaders isn't as noble.

(via wretchedoftheearth)

Things to look Forward to when I get home

My family of course

My doggy and giving her a bath

Mike

2 nights, 3 days of Camping, Assateague, and Ocean City

Thrifting- Def hitting up buffalo exchange atleast once, plus a Good Will or two AND now that I have an apt I can buy things for it <3

Maryland Crabs…yum! 

Ethiopian Food either at Dukem in DC or Balt or at MIke’s house

Chicken City- Cheese Steaks and chicken boxes 

Being able to read my texts

maybe seeing some friends 

Atlantic City with my college besties (the first weekend of the semester?) 

(via dadaists)

Be responsible for the energy you bring. — (via maybe-lisa)

(via real-down-tomarsgirl)